Saturday, May 18, 2024

BLOG: JOSHUA DIPZINSKI AND PREMIER DIALYSIS


BLOG ABOUT JOSHUA DIPZINSKI, CEO AND CO-FOUNDER OF PREMIERE DIALYSIS, WHERE INNOVATIVE HOME DIALYSIS HAPPENS!


INTRODUCTION

On May 17, 2024 at 7pmCST, we did a Broadcast with Joshua Dipzinski about the innovations in home dialysis treatment going on at Premiere Dialysis.
https://premier-dialysis.com/

You can check out the Broadcast on YOU TUBE at https://www.youtube.com/live/2jdI_9P9kZY?si=pT6ksNBoITboC7sl.

The main goal of Premiere Dialysis is to raise the bar on the standards of care in home dialysis. Joshua says, "My only goal is to work with my partner to raise the bar on standards of care in dialysis, educate patients, and empower them for home dialysis settings. Premier Dialysis intends to provide patients with the exact amount of dialysis they need while they get a transplant. QLPD & QLHD are the two models of care we use to make this happen."

THE FIRST TRUE HOME DIALYSIS PROGRAM

The aim of Premiere Dialysis is to change the entire home dialysis industry by insuring all patients are given all of their options and not going from zero diaysis to 12 hours a week or 8-10 hours on a PD Cycler. 

The First True Home Dialysis Program means practically all of the necessary patient activities for home dialysis take place in the patient’s home. Blood Draws occur in the patient's home. Physicians, Social Workers and Dieticians meet you at your home. Premier takes any issues with lack of transportation out of the equation.

"All the other companies that provide home dialysis” require a patient to miss work for two weeks, learn at the clinic, then return home to relearn the process in a new environment essentially. Why not learn it one and done in your actual live environment? " says Josh.

THE THREE INNOVATIVE PROTOCOLS TO PERFORM HOME DIALYSIS AT PREMIER

There are 3 innovative, alternative protocols to perform peritoneal dialysis at Premiere:

1. QLPD

Our QLPD protocol is a dextrose-free, cycler-free dialysis methodology that focuses on a patient’s quality of life recognizing that is the most important concern in a CKD patient’s kidney disease journey.

What can be expected from the QLPD approach?

– Fewer insulin requirements. Patients have seen drops in Hemoglobin A1C after starting our dextrose-free dialysis program.

– Better protection of the peritoneal membrane. Dextrose harms the membrane. It often requires more and more volume and time to achieve adequacy (Kt/V). The dextrose-free Icodextrin solution we employ helps better maintain a patient’s peritoneal membrane. We have patients at three years with NO additional dialysate requirements.

– Cycler-free treatment. Our trademarked approach was created to keep patients from requiring more aggressive forms of home dialysis. A patient’s quality of life vastly improves they’re not required to be strapped to a PD machine for 8-16 hours an evening. Not needing to schedule around dialysis helps both the patient and those they with whom they live.

– More time “to live”. Imagine only 20 minutes daily dedicated to performing dialysis (on average) with QLPD. Our medication management and innovative practices allow patients to fill for 10 minutes at night then disconnect and go spend time with friends and family. In the AM, the patient simply drains for 10 minutes and then goes about their day. No additional exchanges are required.

– Lower hospitalization rate. Although we are a young company, our results are garnering attention in a big way. Our hospitalization rate has been hovering at one-third of the national average. Our clinical staff monitors each patient remotely to keep them safe and happy at home. A patient’s labs are shared with other members of their healthcare team meaning fewer unnecessary needle sticks. No patient should be meant to feel like a pin cushion.

– Proprietary technology. Our patent-pending dialysis tray is designed to reduce infection by placing all cleaning solutions, hand sanitizers, and hold transfer sets in place so the dialysis can be performed one-handed and/or by patients with limited vision or other potential challenges.

– Proprietary app. Available at both the App Store and Google Play, our powerful app features a remote patient management (RPM) tool that reminds patients to chart. When they do chart, a nurse is notified if any vitals are outside of the normal parameters. The nurse is notified of high blood pressure, elevated temperature, or any other concerning changes in the patient’s condition.

– Maintained residual function. Consistent with our belief that patients can be receiving too much dialysis, we use medications and fluids to keep a patient’s kidneys working. That is critical as it can slow or even reduce the disease progression. This results in fewer medications like ESA (to make new red blood cells) and IV iron being needed to maintain optimal lab values. Should those be needed, we are prepared to administer them right in the patient’s home.

https://premier-dialysis.com/what-we-offer/

According to Josh, what is important here is to, "keep people urinating. Hemodialysis is notorious for restricting fluids and removing a ton of fluid. A body without fluid ends up shutting down the kidneys quickly. At Premier, everyone from QLPD to QLHD gets diuretics and is encouraged to drink fluids (all based on 24-hour urine results)"

2. QLPD Cycler

Our QLPD Cycler protocol, a modified version of our QLPD protocol, is employed when necessary.

– Less cycler time. Our QLPD Cycler ensures less time on the cycler…just enough to achieve what’s needed for kt/v. Reduced cycler treatments help patients remain free to travel while living an almost completely normal life.

– Fewer dextrose solutions. The solutions associated with this approach are often no higher than 1.5% to help protect your peritoneal membrane.

https://premier-dialysis.com/what-we-offe

3. QLHD

Our QLHD (Home Hemodialysis) also focuses on maintaining a greater quality of life

– Fewer HHD days. Spending less time with hemodialysis means you can spend more time living your best life.

– Focused on your specific needs. Our process focuses on your residual urine volume to help maintain your native kidney functionality.
https://premier-dialysis.com/what-we-offe


THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING DEXTROSE-FREE

Josh speaks to the importance of being Dextrose-free:

"QLPD also includes trying to keep patients “dextrose free” as much as possible. In the peritoneal membrane, there are many blood vessels. With traditional PD, the dextrose changes the way those vessels transfer the toxins from the blood to the abdomen. Over time, dextrose exposure makes staying on PD more difficult. In a last-ditch effort to keep a patient on pd, the units bring in icodextrin (extraneal), a sugar-free solution. It is used as a last line of treatment because it costs 3x more than traditional dextrose. Premier utilizes icodextrin as a first-line treatment because not having dextrose PRESERVES the peritoneal membrane. It means that dialysis dosing doesn't have to escalate the same way it does with dextrose-based PD products. Essentially, remaining dextrose-free, we believe, will indicate that people can prolong the standard 2-23 years on PD before switching to hemodialysis. Our goal is to go from PD to transplant without ever seeing hemodialysis. Being dextrose-free is our way to attempt to achieve this. "

ONE OF PREMIERE'S STATED GOALS IS TO HELP THE DIALYSIS PATIENT ACHIEVE A KIDNEY TRANSPLANT

One thing many of the major Dialysis Chains have been accused is not informing the patient or adequately explaining to the patient Kidney Transplant as an option for treatment. Frequently, the Chains are accused of being more interested in money than in the individual patient's best interests.

Premiere takes a different approach. Their website clearly states, "We will help you with getting on the transplant list. Our social workers will assist you in achieving what your end goal should be."

Josh addressed this issue: "In the past 3.5 years, we have been fortunate to have six kidney transplants. Many of those were even during our <20 patient phase. We always say that while we have the best dialysis, you can perform for the most negligible impact on life, NO dialysis is way better. In fact, with our model, we have had five occasions where the numbers improved so much that we actually took people off dialysis. The feeling of telling someone to stop dialysis is probably one of the best conversations you can have with someone. Transplants actually impact a clinic score in a major positive way. Despite that knowledge, some companies still would prefer monetary gain over a great clinic score. Overall, I wouldn't dare to call us different: there are many social workers who want to see patients transplanted and make great efforts to help people. We just want to be known as a place you go to not only for easier dialysis regimen but people that want to see you off dialysis altogether. A funny thing can occur: you can put patients' quality of life and mental state first and still be successful while putting patients first."



CONCLUSIONS

There any new innovations coming up at Premiere Dialysis!
Transition services for nurses, integrated blood pressure cuffs and weight scales, hands-free charting  where patients receive a phone call to ask for their dialysis documentation to create a “chartless charting.” The big companies have billions over us. They work very hard to prevent us to expand and open new facilities. We can stay ahead by constantly improving our tech and staying current on ISPD guideline.

You can contact Josh at:
Joshua Dipzinski RN BSN CNN
1.888.KIDNEY-0
www.premier-dialysis.com
email: josh@premier-diaiysis.com

























Friday, May 17, 2024

BROADCAST WITH JOSHUA DIPZINSKI

 Did You Miss The Broadcast With JOSHUA DIPZINSKI, CEO & CO FOUNDER OF PREMIER DIALYSIS, working to raise the bar on the standards of care in home dialysis? Catch the Instant Replay Here!

https://www.youtube.com/live/2jdI_9P9kZY?si=O0Nkpk0pPDloAlXS


Saturday, May 4, 2024

BROADCAST WITH KIM CONSTANTINESCO

Did You Miss The Broadcast With Kim Constantinesco,Living Kidney Donor Athlete, NKF KAC Member, and devoted advocate for her Broadway performing kidney recipient. Catch The Instant Replay Here! Be sure to Subscribe to My You Tube Channel, so you don't miss any great Kidney Stories!
https://www.youtube.com/live/3T_YfHZZPRo?si=t0nEILzmowBvCYZ4


Saturday, April 27, 2024

BROADCAST WITH GAIL RAE-GARWOOD

 Did You Miss The Broadcast (YOU TUBE VERSION) With GAIL RAE-GARWOOD, Blogger, Award Winning Author, Kidney Advocate, Kidney Educator? Catch the Instant Replay Here! Please Subscribe!

Did You Miss The Broadcast (YOU TUBE VERSION) With GAIL RAE-GARWOOD, Blogger, Award Winning Author, Kidney Advocate, Kidney Educator? Catch the Instant Replay Here! Please Subscribe!
https://www.youtube.com/live/W9gz1dYEpM8?si=2SC3PhX9189Gt9vH

Saturday, April 20, 2024

Broadcast With JULIE LYNN NAST

 Did You Miss The Broadcast With JULIE LYNN NAST, Survivor, Kidney Transplant & Rejection Patient, Long Time Dialysis Patient, Courageous Kidney Advocate? 

Catch the Instant Replay Here!
https://www.facebook.com/share/v/N2i8tGwuGhH4wwVw/?mibextid=oFDknk

Saturday, April 13, 2024

BROADCAST WITH HOLLY BODE

 Did You Miss The Broadcast  With Holly Bode, VP of Government Affairs at the American Kidney Fund? Discussion about AKF Initiatives, Programs & Events. Catch The Instant Replay Here!

https://www.facebook.com/share/v/ZCb4KsCSUqykaqFK/?mibextid=oFDknk



Saturday, April 6, 2024

AIMEE MACKOVIC BROADCAST

 Did You Miss The Broadcast With Aimee Mackovic, Professor, Author and Award Winning Poet? She is also a Heart, Liver & Kidney Transplant Recipient! Catch The Instant Replay Here!

https://fb.watch/rgmpinmrCA/?mibextid=Nif5oz

Friday, March 29, 2024

BROADCAST WITH STEVE BELCHER THE KIDNEY NURSE

Did You Miss The Broadcast With Steve Belcher, The Kidney Nurse, on his new book, CONQUERING THE BIG THREE: A GUIDE TO DIABETES, HYPERTENSION AND KIDNEY DISEASE? Catch The Instant Replay Here!




https://www.facebook.com/share/v/zFKAuGtgdAFS6cak/?mibextid=oFDknk

Wednesday, March 13, 2024

BLOG ON HEARING LOSS AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE


 THE CONNECTION BETWEEN CKD AND HEARING LOSS



1. INTRODUCTION

In my lifetime I have lost the hearing in my right ear. Recently, I discovered that my hearing loss may be connected to my 42 years of CKD/PKD, so I wanted to share what I have learned.

I did a Broadcast on Friday, March 8, 2024 on Hearing Loss and Kidney Disease.
THE CONNECTION BETWEEN CKD AND HEARING LOSS


1. INTRODUCTION

In my lifetime I have lost the hearing in my right ear. Recently, I discovered that my hearing loss may be connected to my 42 years of CKD/PKD, so I wanted to share what I have learned.

I did a Broadcast on Friday, March 8, 2024 on Hearing Loss and Kidney Disease.
https://www.facebook.com/share/v/UjtBWRctbtTqoF4i/?mibextid=oFDknk

Here are some of my thoughts.



2. IS THERE A CONNECTION BETWEEN  KIDNEY DISEASE AND YOUR LOSS OF HEARING?

According to experts, there is a connection Kidney Disease and a Loss of Hearing. (Nature.com)

There are nearly 1.6 billion people that and suffer from a hearing loss & is the third-leading cause of disability worldwide.
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also a common condition that is associated with adverse clinical outcomes and high health-care costs. It affects 15% of US adults & 37 million people are estimated to have chronic kidney disease.

The question is whether or not there is a connection between the two.  The answer appears to be yes. According to experts, The kidneys and the hearing organs share a common morphogenetic(same cells, tisue & genetic structure)origin and rely on similar biological structures (for example, cilia) and processes (for example, specialized cellular transport mechanisms) to function.

So the same Genetic Abnormalities that cause CKD can also cause hearing loss, and vice versa.

The NIH states," Inadequate excretion of metabolic waste products by the kidneys results in circulation of these toxic materials in the body. This can cause damage to tissues and organ systems including the auditory system which can lead to hearing loss."

According to Nature.com, "A strong, graded and independent relationship exists between kidney function and the risk of hearing loss; the highest risk is observed in patients on haemodialysis, but kidney transplant recipients and people with mild CKD are also at increased risk."

Because tissue in our ear is substantially similar to the tissue in our kidneys, the toxic build up that damages kidney tissue also is capable of damaging inner ear tissue.

This appears to be confirmed by a 2010 study in Australia, that not just specific Kidney Diseases, but Kidney Disease in general can cause hearing loss in Kidney Patients. "This study examined the medical records of 2,564 people aged 50 and over, 513 of whom had moderate chronic kidney disease. Some 54.4% of all the patients with chronic kidney disease had some degree of hearing loss, as compared to only 28.3% of those who had no kidney problems.” Even more interesting, 30% of the CKD patients had a severe hearing loss compared to just 10% in those patients without CKD."

The study concluded, "The link can be explained by structural and functional similarities between tissues in the inner ear and in the kidney. Additionally, toxins that accumulate in kidney failure can damage nerves, including those in the inner ear." Also, some treatments for kidney ailments are ototoxic, meaning they cause hearing loss."

As stated earlier, this is readily found in patients that are on hemodialysis.

Experts suggest that Infants, children and  adults with malformation or dysfunction of their hearing organs should be evaluated for the presence of malformation or dysfunction of their kidneys, and people with Kidney Disease should have their hearing checked for loss.

3. IN CERTAIN TYPES OF KIDNEY DISEASES HEARING LOSS IS MORE PROMINENT THAN IN OTHERS

Some types of Kidney Diseases are mentioned more prominently than others in the literature as causes of hearing loss and if you have one of these diseases you may wish to have your hearing checked as well as your  kidney function.



These diseases include:

• Alport's Syndrome
• Polycystic Kidney Disease
• Meniere's Disease

Many people with Alport's Syndrome have problems with their ears and eyes. Alport syndrome is a rare inherited disorder that damages the tiny blood vessels in the kidneys. It can also cause hearing loss and eye problems.

Alport syndrome is an inherited form of kidney inflammation (nephritis). It is caused by a defect (mutation) in a gene for a protein in the connective tissue, called collagen.

The disorder is rare. There are three genetic types:

• X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) -- This is the most common type. The disease is more severe in males than in females.

• Autosomal recessive Alport syndrome (ARAS) -- Males and females have equally severe disease.

• Autosomal dominant Alport syndrome (ADAS) -- This is the rarest type. Males and females have equally severe disease.

The frequency in which hearing loss appears with Alport's is striking. Studies show that, approximately, 70% of patients with AS suffer from progressive sensorineural hearing loss.  Over time, Alport syndrome also leads to hearing loss in both ears. By the early teens, it is more common in males with XLAS, though in females, hearing loss is not as common and happens when they're adults. With ARAS, boys and girls have hearing loss during childhood. With ADAS, it occurs later in life. Hearing loss usually occurs before kidney failure.

Approximately 80% of males with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) develop hearing loss during their lifetime, often by their teens. Hearing loss in females with XLAS is less frequent and occurs later in life, although about 40% will experience hearing loss.

Hearing Loss With Polycystic Kidney Disease
Studies have shown that Polycystic Kidney Disease can cause hearing loss. One study in particular found a family with ADPKD associated with bilateral sensorineural deafness in a pedigree of four affected members in four generations.

Hearing Loss and Meniere's Disease

Several studies  harmful effects of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on the audiovestibular system. This would include a connection between Chronic Kidney Disease and Meniere's Disease. Patients with CKD had a significantly increased incidence of Ménière’s disease,


According to the Mayo Clinic, Meniere's disease is an inner ear problem that can cause dizzy spells, also called vertigo, and hearing loss. Most of the time, Meniere's disease affects only one ear.

Meniere's disease can happen at any age. But it usually starts between the ages of 40 to 60. It's thought to be a lifelong condition. But some treatments can help ease symptoms and lessen how it affects your life long term.

Symptoms of Meniere's disease include:

• Regular dizzy spells. You have a spinning feeling that starts and stops suddenly. Vertigo may start without warning. It usually lasts 20 minutes to 12 hours, but not more than 24 hours. Serious vertigo can cause nausea.

• Hearing loss. Hearing loss in Meniere's disease may come and go, especially early on. Over time, hearing loss can be long-lasting and not get better.

• Ringing in the ear. Ringing in the ear is called tinnitus. Tinnitus is the term for when you have a ringing, buzzing, roaring, whistling or hissing sound in your ear.

• Feeling of fullness in the ear. People with Meniere's disease often feel pressure in the ear. This is called aural fullness.

After a vertigo attack, symptoms get better and might go away for a while. Over time, how many vertigo attacks you have may lessen.

To Diagnose Meniere's, the physician will conduct an exam and asks about your health history. A Meniere's disease diagnosis needs to include:

• Two or more vertigo attacks, each lasting 20 minutes to 12 hours, or up to 24 hours.

• Hearing loss proved by a hearing test.

• Tinnitus or a feeling of fullness or pressure in the ear.
A Balance Assessment will take place.

Between vertigo attacks, balance returns to normal for most people with Meniere's disease. But you might have some ongoing balance problems.

Tests that study how well the inner ear is working include:

Electronystagmogram or videonystagmography (ENG or VNG). These tests measure balance by studying eye movement. One part of the test looks at eye movement while your eyes follow a target. One part studies eye movement while your head is put in different positions. A third test, called the caloric test, follows eye movement by using temperature changes to trigger a reaction from the inner ear. Your healthcare provider may use warm and cold air or water in the ear for the caloric test.

No cure exists for Meniere's disease. Some treatments can help lessen how bad vertigo attacks are and how long they last. But there are no treatments for permanent hearing loss. Your healthcare provider may be able to suggest treatments that prevent your hearing loss from getting worse.

Treatment Methods include:

Medicines for vertigo

Your healthcare provider may prescribe medicines to take during a vertigo attack so that it's less severe:

• Motion sickness medicines. Medicines such as meclizine (Antivert) or diazepam (Valium) may lessen the spinning feeling and help control nausea and vomiting.

• Anti-nausea medicines. Medicines such as promethazine might control nausea and vomiting during a vertigo attack.

• Diuretics and betahistine. These medicines can be used together or alone to improve vertigo. Diuretics lower how much fluid is in the body, which may lower the amount of extra fluid in the inner ear. Betahistines ease vertigo symptoms by improving blood flow to the inner ear.

Long-term medicine use

Your healthcare provider may prescribe a medicine to reduce fluid retention and suggest limiting your salt intake. This helps control the intensity and amount of Meniere's disease symptoms in some people.

Noninvasive therapies and procedures

Some people with Meniere's disease may benefit from procedures that don't include surgery, such as:

• Rehabilitation. If you have balance problems between vertigo attacks, vestibular rehabilitation therapy might improve your balance.

• Hearing aid. A hearing aid in the ear affected by Meniere's disease might improve your hearing. Your healthcare provider can refer you to an ear doctor, also called an audiologist, to talk about the best hearing aids for you.

If conservative treatments aren't successful, your care provider might suggest more-intense treatments.

Middle ear injections

Medicines injected and absorbed in the middle ear may help vertigo symptoms get better. This treatment is done in a care provider's office. Injections can include:

• Gentamicin. This is an antibiotic that's toxic to your inner ear. It works by damaging the sick part of your ear that's causing vertigo. Your healthy ear then takes on the job for balance. But there is a risk of further hearing loss.

• Steroids. Steroids such as dexamethasone also may help control vertigo attacks in some people. Dexamethasone may not work as well as gentamicin. But it's less likely to cause further hearing loss.

Surgery

If vertigo attacks from Meniere's disease are severe and hard to bear and other treatments don't help, surgery might be an option. Procedures include:

• Endolymphatic sac surgery. The endolymphatic sac helps control inner ear fluid levels. This procedure relieves pressure around the endolymphatic sac, which can improve fluid levels. Sometimes, a care provider places a tube inside your ear to drain any extra fluid.

• Labyrinthectomy. With this procedure, the surgeon removes the parts of your ear causing vertigo, which causes complete hearing loss in that ear. This allows your healthy ear to be in charge of sending information about balance and hearing to your brain. Care providers only suggest this procedure if you have poor hearing or total hearing loss in the diseased ear.

• Vestibular nerve section. This procedure involves cutting the vestibular nerve to prevent information about movement from getting to the brain. The vestibular nerve sends balance and movement information from your inner ear to the brain. This procedure usually improves vertigo and keeps hearing in the diseased ear. Most people need medicine that puts them in a sleep-like state, called general anesthesia, and an overnight hospital stay.


What illness causes hearing damage?

Certain diseases can cause hearing loss, including meningitis, mumps, cytomegalovirus and chickenpox. Severe cases of jaundice can also cause hearing loss. other causes – other causes of deafness include Meniere's disease and exposure to certain chemicals.

4. CONCLUSIONS

There is a significant relationship between CKD and Hearing Loss. One recent article states, "Patients with CKD are predisposed to several otorhinolaryngological issues especially SNHL, and the link between SNHL (sensorineural hearing loss)
and CKD has both been extensively explained, but the relationship between the remaining complications and CKD is still unknown."

In plain English, if you suffer from CKD, you should get your hearing checked, and if you have any symptoms that we have discussed today, you may wish to consult with an otolaryngologist.

5. REFERENCES

A.. Can Kidney Disease Lead to Hearing Loss?

The multifaceted links between hearing loss and chronic kidney disease
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41581-024-00808-2#:~:text=A%20strong%2C%20graded%20and%20independent,are%20also%20at%20increased%20risk.

Hearing impairment among chronic kidney disease patients on haemodialysis at a tertiary hospital in Ghana
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6842730/#:~:text=Chronic%20kidney%20disease%20is%20a,can%20lead%20to%20hearing%20loss.

What is the relationship between the kidneys and the ears?
Tissues of the kidney and the inner ear are similar and share a common metabolic function, therefore problems that affect kidney function can also damage the inner ear. High blood pressure, diabetes and a family history of CKD can increase your risk of developing kidney problems and hearing problems.
https://yvdwaudiology.co.za/blog/your-kidneys-and-your-ears/#:~:text=Tissues%20of%20the%20kidney%20and,kidney%20problems%20and%20hearing%20problems.

Hearing Loss  in Patients on Hemodialysis

Hearing impairment among chronic kidney disease patients on haemodialysis at a tertiary hospital in Ghana
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6842730/

Hearing loss causes
https://www.healthyhearing.com/help/hearing-loss/causes

The Link Between Kidneys and Your Hearing
https://hearinghealthfoundation.org/blogs/the-link-between-your-kidneys-and-your-hearing

Kidney Disease a Surprising Reason For Hearing Loss
https://www.hearingunlimited.net/kidney-disease-a-surprising-reason-for-hearing-loss/
(a specific part of our ears shares functional and structural characteristics with our kidneys. Research has confirmed that physiological mechanisms of fluid and electrolyte balance are present in both organs. This matters because it means that when a health issue affects the functionality of one (i.e. the kidneys or the ears), it’s likely to affect the other. So while hearing loss doesn’t cause CKD – or vice versa – patients with certain types of hearing loss are likely to experience problems with their kidneys (and vice versa).


The Relationship Between Cochlea and Kidney
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/227808405_The_Relationship_Between_Cochlea_and_Kidney

B. Other Kidney Diseases That Can Cause Hearing Loss:

• Alport's Syndrome
From the NKF:
Alport's Syndrome
https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/alport (General Description);

Alport's Syndrome; Symptoms and Causes
https://www.pennmedicine.org/for-patients-and-visitors/patient-information/conditions-treated-a-to-z/alport-syndrome

Characterization of Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Children with Alport Syndrome
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7766141/

How often does Alport syndrome cause hearing loss?

Approximately 80% of males with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) develop hearing loss during their lifetime, often by their teens. Hearing loss in females with XLAS is less frequent and occurs later in life, although about 40% will experience hearing loss.

Hearing Loss in Alport syndrome
https://alportsyndrome.org/hearing-loss-in-alport-syndrome/

Alport syndrome
https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/alport-syndrome/#frequency

Deafblind Fact Sheet: Alport Syndrome
https://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-db_factsheetwp_alport#:~:text=Approximately%2080%25%20of%20young%20males,often%20by%20their%20teenage%20years.




• Polycystic Kidney Disease

Studies have shown that Polycystic Kidney Disease can cause hearing loss. One study in particular found a family with ADPKD associated with bilateral sensorineural deafness in a pedigree of four affected members in four generations.

Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Associated with Familial Sensorineural Deafness
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/003655999750016302

Polycystic kidney disease and sensorineural deafness
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283581697_Polycystic_kidney_disease_and_sensorineural_deafness
Hearing Loss and Meniere's Disease

Connection Between Meniere's Disease and CKD

Chronic kidney disease is associated with increased risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss and Ménière’s disease: a nationwide cohort study
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8511089/



Meniere's Disease
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/menieres-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20374910
(Meniere's disease is an inner ear problem that can cause dizzy spells, also called vertigo, and hearing loss. Most of the time, Meniere's disease affects only one ear.

Meniere's disease can happen at any age. But it usually starts between the ages of 40 to 60. It's thought to be a lifelong condition. But some treatments can help ease symptoms and lessen how it affects your life long term.)

What is Meniere's Disease?
https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/menieres-disease

Meniere Disease
https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/menieres-disease


C. Diseases In General That Can Cause Hearing Loss :

Certain diseases can cause hearing loss, including meningitis, mumps, cytomegalovirus and chickenpox. Severe cases of jaundice can also cause hearing loss. other causes – other causes of deafness include Meniere's disease and exposure to certain chemicals.

Deafness - a range of causes
https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/deafness-a-range-of-causes

D. Conclusion
Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Comprehensive Review
https://www.cureus.com/articles/169480-sensorineural-hearing-loss-in-patients-with-chronic-kidney-disease-a-comprehensive-review#!/





















THE CONNECTION BETWEEN CKD AND HEARING LOSS


1. INTRODUCTION

In my lifetime I have lost the hearing in my right ear. Recently, I discovered that my hearing loss may be connected to my 42 years of CKD/PKD, so I wanted to share what I have learned.

I did a Broadcast on Friday, March 8, 2024 on Hearing Loss and Kidney Disease.
https://www.facebook.com/share/v/UjtBWRctbtTqoF4i/?mibextid=oFDknk

Here are some of my thoughts.



2. IS THERE A CONNECTION BETWEEN  KIDNEY DISEASE AND YOUR LOSS OF HEARING?

According to experts, there is a connection Kidney Disease and a Loss of Hearing. (Nature.com)

There are nearly 1.6 billion people that and suffer from a hearing loss & is the third-leading cause of disability worldwide.
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also a common condition that is associated with adverse clinical outcomes and high health-care costs. It affects 15% of US adults & 37 million people are estimated to have chronic kidney disease.

The question is whether or not there is a connection between the two.  The answer appears to be yes. According to experts, The kidneys and the hearing organs share a common morphogenetic(same cells, tisue & genetic structure)origin and rely on similar biological structures (for example, cilia) and processes (for example, specialized cellular transport mechanisms) to function.

So the same Genetic Abnormalities that cause CKD can also cause hearing loss, and vice versa.

The NIH states," Inadequate excretion of metabolic waste products by the kidneys results in circulation of these toxic materials in the body. This can cause damage to tissues and organ systems including the auditory system which can lead to hearing loss."

According to Nature.com, "A strong, graded and independent relationship exists between kidney function and the risk of hearing loss; the highest risk is observed in patients on haemodialysis, but kidney transplant recipients and people with mild CKD are also at increased risk."

Because tissue in our ear is substantially similar to the tissue in our kidneys, the toxic build up that damages kidney tissue also is capable of damaging inner ear tissue.

This appears to be confirmed by a 2010 study in Australia, that not just specific Kidney Diseases, but Kidney Disease in general can cause hearing loss in Kidney Patients. "This study examined the medical records of 2,564 people aged 50 and over, 513 of whom had moderate chronic kidney disease. Some 54.4% of all the patients with chronic kidney disease had some degree of hearing loss, as compared to only 28.3% of those who had no kidney problems.” Even more interesting, 30% of the CKD patients had a severe hearing loss compared to just 10% in those patients without CKD."

The study concluded, "The link can be explained by structural and functional similarities between tissues in the inner ear and in the kidney. Additionally, toxins that accumulate in kidney failure can damage nerves, including those in the inner ear." Also, some treatments for kidney ailments are ototoxic, meaning they cause hearing loss."

As stated earlier, this is readily found in patients that are on hemodialysis.

Experts suggest that Infants, children and  adults with malformation or dysfunction of their hearing organs should be evaluated for the presence of malformation or dysfunction of their kidneys, and people with Kidney Disease should have their hearing checked for loss.

3. IN CERTAIN TYPES OF KIDNEY DISEASES HEARING LOSS IS MORE PROMINENT THAN IN OTHERS

Some types of Kidney Diseases are mentioned more prominently than others in the literature as causes of hearing loss and if you have one of these diseases you may wish to have your hearing checked as well as your  kidney function.



These diseases include:

• Alport's Syndrome
• Polycystic Kidney Disease
• Meniere's Disease

Many people with Alport's Syndrome have problems with their ears and eyes. Alport syndrome is a rare inherited disorder that damages the tiny blood vessels in the kidneys. It can also cause hearing loss and eye problems.

Alport syndrome is an inherited form of kidney inflammation (nephritis). It is caused by a defect (mutation) in a gene for a protein in the connective tissue, called collagen.

The disorder is rare. There are three genetic types:

• X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) -- This is the most common type. The disease is more severe in males than in females.

• Autosomal recessive Alport syndrome (ARAS) -- Males and females have equally severe disease.

• Autosomal dominant Alport syndrome (ADAS) -- This is the rarest type. Males and females have equally severe disease.

The frequency in which hearing loss appears with Alport's is striking. Studies show that, approximately, 70% of patients with AS suffer from progressive sensorineural hearing loss.  Over time, Alport syndrome also leads to hearing loss in both ears. By the early teens, it is more common in males with XLAS, though in females, hearing loss is not as common and happens when they're adults. With ARAS, boys and girls have hearing loss during childhood. With ADAS, it occurs later in life. Hearing loss usually occurs before kidney failure.

Approximately 80% of males with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) develop hearing loss during their lifetime, often by their teens. Hearing loss in females with XLAS is less frequent and occurs later in life, although about 40% will experience hearing loss.

Hearing Loss With Polycystic Kidney Disease
Studies have shown that Polycystic Kidney Disease can cause hearing loss. One study in particular found a family with ADPKD associated with bilateral sensorineural deafness in a pedigree of four affected members in four generations.

Hearing Loss and Meniere's Disease

Several studies  harmful effects of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on the audiovestibular system. This would include a connection between Chronic Kidney Disease and Meniere's Disease. Patients with CKD had a significantly increased incidence of Ménière’s disease,


According to the Mayo Clinic, Meniere's disease is an inner ear problem that can cause dizzy spells, also called vertigo, and hearing loss. Most of the time, Meniere's disease affects only one ear.

Meniere's disease can happen at any age. But it usually starts between the ages of 40 to 60. It's thought to be a lifelong condition. But some treatments can help ease symptoms and lessen how it affects your life long term.

Symptoms of Meniere's disease include:

• Regular dizzy spells. You have a spinning feeling that starts and stops suddenly. Vertigo may start without warning. It usually lasts 20 minutes to 12 hours, but not more than 24 hours. Serious vertigo can cause nausea.

• Hearing loss. Hearing loss in Meniere's disease may come and go, especially early on. Over time, hearing loss can be long-lasting and not get better.

• Ringing in the ear. Ringing in the ear is called tinnitus. Tinnitus is the term for when you have a ringing, buzzing, roaring, whistling or hissing sound in your ear.

• Feeling of fullness in the ear. People with Meniere's disease often feel pressure in the ear. This is called aural fullness.

After a vertigo attack, symptoms get better and might go away for a while. Over time, how many vertigo attacks you have may lessen.

To Diagnose Meniere's, the physician will conduct an exam and asks about your health history. A Meniere's disease diagnosis needs to include:

• Two or more vertigo attacks, each lasting 20 minutes to 12 hours, or up to 24 hours.

• Hearing loss proved by a hearing test.

• Tinnitus or a feeling of fullness or pressure in the ear.
A Balance Assessment will take place.

Between vertigo attacks, balance returns to normal for most people with Meniere's disease. But you might have some ongoing balance problems.

Tests that study how well the inner ear is working include:

Electronystagmogram or videonystagmography (ENG or VNG). These tests measure balance by studying eye movement. One part of the test looks at eye movement while your eyes follow a target. One part studies eye movement while your head is put in different positions. A third test, called the caloric test, follows eye movement by using temperature changes to trigger a reaction from the inner ear. Your healthcare provider may use warm and cold air or water in the ear for the caloric test.

No cure exists for Meniere's disease. Some treatments can help lessen how bad vertigo attacks are and how long they last. But there are no treatments for permanent hearing loss. Your healthcare provider may be able to suggest treatments that prevent your hearing loss from getting worse.

Treatment Methods include:

Medicines for vertigo

Your healthcare provider may prescribe medicines to take during a vertigo attack so that it's less severe:

• Motion sickness medicines. Medicines such as meclizine (Antivert) or diazepam (Valium) may lessen the spinning feeling and help control nausea and vomiting.

• Anti-nausea medicines. Medicines such as promethazine might control nausea and vomiting during a vertigo attack.

• Diuretics and betahistine. These medicines can be used together or alone to improve vertigo. Diuretics lower how much fluid is in the body, which may lower the amount of extra fluid in the inner ear. Betahistines ease vertigo symptoms by improving blood flow to the inner ear.

Long-term medicine use

Your healthcare provider may prescribe a medicine to reduce fluid retention and suggest limiting your salt intake. This helps control the intensity and amount of Meniere's disease symptoms in some people.

Noninvasive therapies and procedures

Some people with Meniere's disease may benefit from procedures that don't include surgery, such as:

• Rehabilitation. If you have balance problems between vertigo attacks, vestibular rehabilitation therapy might improve your balance.

• Hearing aid. A hearing aid in the ear affected by Meniere's disease might improve your hearing. Your healthcare provider can refer you to an ear doctor, also called an audiologist, to talk about the best hearing aids for you.

If conservative treatments aren't successful, your care provider might suggest more-intense treatments.

Middle ear injections

Medicines injected and absorbed in the middle ear may help vertigo symptoms get better. This treatment is done in a care provider's office. Injections can include:

• Gentamicin. This is an antibiotic that's toxic to your inner ear. It works by damaging the sick part of your ear that's causing vertigo. Your healthy ear then takes on the job for balance. But there is a risk of further hearing loss.

• Steroids. Steroids such as dexamethasone also may help control vertigo attacks in some people. Dexamethasone may not work as well as gentamicin. But it's less likely to cause further hearing loss.

Surgery

If vertigo attacks from Meniere's disease are severe and hard to bear and other treatments don't help, surgery might be an option. Procedures include:

• Endolymphatic sac surgery. The endolymphatic sac helps control inner ear fluid levels. This procedure relieves pressure around the endolymphatic sac, which can improve fluid levels. Sometimes, a care provider places a tube inside your ear to drain any extra fluid.

• Labyrinthectomy. With this procedure, the surgeon removes the parts of your ear causing vertigo, which causes complete hearing loss in that ear. This allows your healthy ear to be in charge of sending information about balance and hearing to your brain. Care providers only suggest this procedure if you have poor hearing or total hearing loss in the diseased ear.

• Vestibular nerve section. This procedure involves cutting the vestibular nerve to prevent information about movement from getting to the brain. The vestibular nerve sends balance and movement information from your inner ear to the brain. This procedure usually improves vertigo and keeps hearing in the diseased ear. Most people need medicine that puts them in a sleep-like state, called general anesthesia, and an overnight hospital stay.


What illness causes hearing damage?

Certain diseases can cause hearing loss, including meningitis, mumps, cytomegalovirus and chickenpox. Severe cases of jaundice can also cause hearing loss. other causes – other causes of deafness include Meniere's disease and exposure to certain chemicals.

4. CONCLUSIONS

There is a significant relationship between CKD and Hearing Loss. One recent article states, "Patients with CKD are predisposed to several otorhinolaryngological issues especially SNHL, and the link between SNHL (sensorineural hearing loss)
and CKD has both been extensively explained, but the relationship between the remaining complications and CKD is still unknown."

In plain English, if you suffer from CKD, you should get your hearing checked, and if you have any symptoms that we have discussed today, you may wish to consult with an otolaryngologist.

5. REFERENCES

A.. Can Kidney Disease Lead to Hearing Loss?

The multifaceted links between hearing loss and chronic kidney disease
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41581-024-00808-2#:~:text=A%20strong%2C%20graded%20and%20independent,are%20also%20at%20increased%20risk.

Hearing impairment among chronic kidney disease patients on haemodialysis at a tertiary hospital in Ghana
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6842730/#:~:text=Chronic%20kidney%20disease%20is%20a,can%20lead%20to%20hearing%20loss.

What is the relationship between the kidneys and the ears?
Tissues of the kidney and the inner ear are similar and share a common metabolic function, therefore problems that affect kidney function can also damage the inner ear. High blood pressure, diabetes and a family history of CKD can increase your risk of developing kidney problems and hearing problems.
https://yvdwaudiology.co.za/blog/your-kidneys-and-your-ears/#:~:text=Tissues%20of%20the%20kidney%20and,kidney%20problems%20and%20hearing%20problems.

Hearing Loss  in Patients on Hemodialysis

Hearing impairment among chronic kidney disease patients on haemodialysis at a tertiary hospital in Ghana
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6842730/

Hearing loss causes
https://www.healthyhearing.com/help/hearing-loss/causes

The Link Between Kidneys and Your Hearing
https://hearinghealthfoundation.org/blogs/the-link-between-your-kidneys-and-your-hearing

Kidney Disease a Surprising Reason For Hearing Loss
https://www.hearingunlimited.net/kidney-disease-a-surprising-reason-for-hearing-loss/
(a specific part of our ears shares functional and structural characteristics with our kidneys. Research has confirmed that physiological mechanisms of fluid and electrolyte balance are present in both organs. This matters because it means that when a health issue affects the functionality of one (i.e. the kidneys or the ears), it’s likely to affect the other. So while hearing loss doesn’t cause CKD – or vice versa – patients with certain types of hearing loss are likely to experience problems with their kidneys (and vice versa).


The Relationship Between Cochlea and Kidney
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/227808405_The_Relationship_Between_Cochlea_and_Kidney

B. Other Kidney Diseases That Can Cause Hearing Loss:

• Alport's Syndrome
From the NKF:
Alport's Syndrome
https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/alport (General Description);

Alport's Syndrome; Symptoms and Causes
https://www.pennmedicine.org/for-patients-and-visitors/patient-information/conditions-treated-a-to-z/alport-syndrome

Characterization of Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Children with Alport Syndrome
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7766141/

How often does Alport syndrome cause hearing loss?

Approximately 80% of males with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) develop hearing loss during their lifetime, often by their teens. Hearing loss in females with XLAS is less frequent and occurs later in life, although about 40% will experience hearing loss.

Hearing Loss in Alport syndrome
https://alportsyndrome.org/hearing-loss-in-alport-syndrome/

Alport syndrome
https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/alport-syndrome/#frequency

Deafblind Fact Sheet: Alport Syndrome
https://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-db_factsheetwp_alport#:~:text=Approximately%2080%25%20of%20young%20males,often%20by%20their%20teenage%20years.




• Polycystic Kidney Disease

Studies have shown that Polycystic Kidney Disease can cause hearing loss. One study in particular found a family with ADPKD associated with bilateral sensorineural deafness in a pedigree of four affected members in four generations.

Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Associated with Familial Sensorineural Deafness
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/003655999750016302

Polycystic kidney disease and sensorineural deafness
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283581697_Polycystic_kidney_disease_and_sensorineural_deafness
Hearing Loss and Meniere's Disease

Connection Between Meniere's Disease and CKD

Chronic kidney disease is associated with increased risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss and Ménière’s disease: a nationwide cohort study
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8511089/



Meniere's Disease
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/menieres-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20374910
(Meniere's disease is an inner ear problem that can cause dizzy spells, also called vertigo, and hearing loss. Most of the time, Meniere's disease affects only one ear.

Meniere's disease can happen at any age. But it usually starts between the ages of 40 to 60. It's thought to be a lifelong condition. But some treatments can help ease symptoms and lessen how it affects your life long term.)

What is Meniere's Disease?
https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/menieres-disease

Meniere Disease
https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/menieres-disease


C. Diseases In General That Can Cause Hearing Loss :

Certain diseases can cause hearing loss, including meningitis, mumps, cytomegalovirus and chickenpox. Severe cases of jaundice can also cause hearing loss. other causes – other causes of deafness include Meniere's disease and exposure to certain chemicals.

Deafness - a range of causes
https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/deafness-a-range-of-causes

D. Conclusion
Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Comprehensive Review
https://www.cureus.com/articles/169480-sensorineural-hearing-loss-in-patients-with-chronic-kidney-disease-a-comprehensive-review#!/




































Here are some of my thoughts.



2. IS THERE A CONNECTION BETWEEN  KIDNEY DISEASE AND YOUR LOSS OF HEARING?

According to experts, there is a connection Kidney Disease and a Loss of Hearing. (Nature.com)

There are nearly 1.6 billion people that and suffer from a hearing loss & is the third-leading cause of disability worldwide.
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also a common condition that is associated with adverse clinical outcomes and high health-care costs. It affects 15% of US adults & 37 million people are estimated to have chronic kidney disease.

The question is whether or not there is a connection between the two.  The answer appears to be yes. According to experts, The kidneys and the hearing organs share a common morphogenetic(same cells, tisue & genetic structure)origin and rely on similar biological structures (for example, cilia) and processes (for example, specialized cellular transport mechanisms) to function.

So the same Genetic Abnormalities that cause CKD can also cause hearing loss, and vice versa.

The NIH states," Inadequate excretion of metabolic waste products by the kidneys results in circulation of these toxic materials in the body. This can cause damage to tissues and organ systems including the auditory system which can lead to hearing loss."

According to Nature.com, "A strong, graded and independent relationship exists between kidney function and the risk of hearing loss; the highest risk is observed in patients on haemodialysis, but kidney transplant recipients and people with mild CKD are also at increased risk."

Because tissue in our ear is substantially similar to the tissue in our kidneys, the toxic build up that damages kidney tissue also is capable of damaging inner ear tissue.

This appears to be confirmed by a 2010 study in Australia, that not just specific Kidney Diseases, but Kidney Disease in general can cause hearing loss in Kidney Patients. "This study examined the medical records of 2,564 people aged 50 and over, 513 of whom had moderate chronic kidney disease. Some 54.4% of all the patients with chronic kidney disease had some degree of hearing loss, as compared to only 28.3% of those who had no kidney problems.” Even more interesting, 30% of the CKD patients had a severe hearing loss compared to just 10% in those patients without CKD."

The study concluded, "The link can be explained by structural and functional similarities between tissues in the inner ear and in the kidney. Additionally, toxins that accumulate in kidney failure can damage nerves, including those in the inner ear." Also, some treatments for kidney ailments are ototoxic, meaning they cause hearing loss."

As stated earlier, this is readily found in patients that are on hemodialysis.

Experts suggest that Infants, children and  adults with malformation or dysfunction of their hearing organs should be evaluated for the presence of malformation or dysfunction of their kidneys, and people with Kidney Disease should have their hearing checked for loss.

3. IN CERTAIN TYPES OF KIDNEY DISEASES HEARING LOSS IS MORE PROMINENT THAN IN OTHERS

Some types of Kidney Diseases are mentioned more prominently than others in the literature as causes of hearing loss and if you have one of these diseases you may wish to have your hearing checked as well as your  kidney function.



These diseases include:

• Alport's Syndrome
• Polycystic Kidney Disease
• Meniere's Disease

Many people with Alport's Syndrome have problems with their ears and eyes. Alport syndrome is a rare inherited disorder that damages the tiny blood vessels in the kidneys. It can also cause hearing loss and eye problems.

Alport syndrome is an inherited form of kidney inflammation (nephritis). It is caused by a defect (mutation) in a gene for a protein in the connective tissue, called collagen.

The disorder is rare. There are three genetic types:

• X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) -- This is the most common type. The disease is more severe in males than in females.

• Autosomal recessive Alport syndrome (ARAS) -- Males and females have equally severe disease.

• Autosomal dominant Alport syndrome (ADAS) -- This is the rarest type. Males and females have equally severe disease.

The frequency in which hearing loss appears with Alport's is striking. Studies show that, approximately, 70% of patients with AS suffer from progressive sensorineural hearing loss.  Over time, Alport syndrome also leads to hearing loss in both ears. By the early teens, it is more common in males with XLAS, though in females, hearing loss is not as common and happens when they're adults. With ARAS, boys and girls have hearing loss during childhood. With ADAS, it occurs later in life. Hearing loss usually occurs before kidney failure.

Approximately 80% of males with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) develop hearing loss during their lifetime, often by their teens. Hearing loss in females with XLAS is less frequent and occurs later in life, although about 40% will experience hearing loss.

Hearing Loss With Polycystic Kidney Disease
Studies have shown that Polycystic Kidney Disease can cause hearing loss. One study in particular found a family with ADPKD associated with bilateral sensorineural deafness in a pedigree of four affected members in four generations.

Hearing Loss and Meniere's Disease

Several studies  harmful effects of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on the audiovestibular system. This would include a connection between Chronic Kidney Disease and Meniere's Disease. Patients with CKD had a significantly increased incidence of Ménière’s disease,


According to the Mayo Clinic, Meniere's disease is an inner ear problem that can cause dizzy spells, also called vertigo, and hearing loss. Most of the time, Meniere's disease affects only one ear.

Meniere's disease can happen at any age. But it usually starts between the ages of 40 to 60. It's thought to be a lifelong condition. But some treatments can help ease symptoms and lessen how it affects your life long term.

Symptoms of Meniere's disease include:

• Regular dizzy spells. You have a spinning feeling that starts and stops suddenly. Vertigo may start without warning. It usually lasts 20 minutes to 12 hours, but not more than 24 hours. Serious vertigo can cause nausea.

• Hearing loss. Hearing loss in Meniere's disease may come and go, especially early on. Over time, hearing loss can be long-lasting and not get better.

• Ringing in the ear. Ringing in the ear is called tinnitus. Tinnitus is the term for when you have a ringing, buzzing, roaring, whistling or hissing sound in your ear.

• Feeling of fullness in the ear. People with Meniere's disease often feel pressure in the ear. This is called aural fullness.

After a vertigo attack, symptoms get better and might go away for a while. Over time, how many vertigo attacks you have may lessen.

To Diagnose Meniere's, the physician will conduct an exam and asks about your health history. A Meniere's disease diagnosis needs to include:

• Two or more vertigo attacks, each lasting 20 minutes to 12 hours, or up to 24 hours.

• Hearing loss proved by a hearing test.

• Tinnitus or a feeling of fullness or pressure in the ear.
A Balance Assessment will take place.

Between vertigo attacks, balance returns to normal for most people with Meniere's disease. But you might have some ongoing balance problems.

Tests that study how well the inner ear is working include:

Electronystagmogram or videonystagmography (ENG or VNG). These tests measure balance by studying eye movement. One part of the test looks at eye movement while your eyes follow a target. One part studies eye movement while your head is put in different positions. A third test, called the caloric test, follows eye movement by using temperature changes to trigger a reaction from the inner ear. Your healthcare provider may use warm and cold air or water in the ear for the caloric test.

No cure exists for Meniere's disease. Some treatments can help lessen how bad vertigo attacks are and how long they last. But there are no treatments for permanent hearing loss. Your healthcare provider may be able to suggest treatments that prevent your hearing loss from getting worse.

Treatment Methods include:

Medicines for vertigo

Your healthcare provider may prescribe medicines to take during a vertigo attack so that it's less severe:

• Motion sickness medicines. Medicines such as meclizine (Antivert) or diazepam (Valium) may lessen the spinning feeling and help control nausea and vomiting.

• Anti-nausea medicines. Medicines such as promethazine might control nausea and vomiting during a vertigo attack.

• Diuretics and betahistine. These medicines can be used together or alone to improve vertigo. Diuretics lower how much fluid is in the body, which may lower the amount of extra fluid in the inner ear. Betahistines ease vertigo symptoms by improving blood flow to the inner ear.

Long-term medicine use

Your healthcare provider may prescribe a medicine to reduce fluid retention and suggest limiting your salt intake. This helps control the intensity and amount of Meniere's disease symptoms in some people.

Noninvasive therapies and procedures

Some people with Meniere's disease may benefit from procedures that don't include surgery, such as:

• Rehabilitation. If you have balance problems between vertigo attacks, vestibular rehabilitation therapy might improve your balance.

• Hearing aid. A hearing aid in the ear affected by Meniere's disease might improve your hearing. Your healthcare provider can refer you to an ear doctor, also called an audiologist, to talk about the best hearing aids for you.

If conservative treatments aren't successful, your care provider might suggest more-intense treatments.

Middle ear injections

Medicines injected and absorbed in the middle ear may help vertigo symptoms get better. This treatment is done in a care provider's office. Injections can include:

• Gentamicin. This is an antibiotic that's toxic to your inner ear. It works by damaging the sick part of your ear that's causing vertigo. Your healthy ear then takes on the job for balance. But there is a risk of further hearing loss.

• Steroids. Steroids such as dexamethasone also may help control vertigo attacks in some people. Dexamethasone may not work as well as gentamicin. But it's less likely to cause further hearing loss.

Surgery

If vertigo attacks from Meniere's disease are severe and hard to bear and other treatments don't help, surgery might be an option. Procedures include:

• Endolymphatic sac surgery. The endolymphatic sac helps control inner ear fluid levels. This procedure relieves pressure around the endolymphatic sac, which can improve fluid levels. Sometimes, a care provider places a tube inside your ear to drain any extra fluid.

• Labyrinthectomy. With this procedure, the surgeon removes the parts of your ear causing vertigo, which causes complete hearing loss in that ear. This allows your healthy ear to be in charge of sending information about balance and hearing to your brain. Care providers only suggest this procedure if you have poor hearing or total hearing loss in the diseased ear.

• Vestibular nerve section. This procedure involves cutting the vestibular nerve to prevent information about movement from getting to the brain. The vestibular nerve sends balance and movement information from your inner ear to the brain. This procedure usually improves vertigo and keeps hearing in the diseased ear. Most people need medicine that puts them in a sleep-like state, called general anesthesia, and an overnight hospital stay.


What illness causes hearing damage?

Certain diseases can cause hearing loss, including meningitis, mumps, cytomegalovirus and chickenpox. Severe cases of jaundice can also cause hearing loss. other causes – other causes of deafness include Meniere's disease and exposure to certain chemicals.

4. CONCLUSIONS

There is a significant relationship between CKD and Hearing Loss. One recent article states, "Patients with CKD are predisposed to several otorhinolaryngological issues especially SNHL, and the link between SNHL (sensorineural hearing loss)
and CKD has both been extensively explained, but the relationship between the remaining complications and CKD is still unknown."

In plain English, if you suffer from CKD, you should get your hearing checked, and if you have any symptoms that we have discussed today, you may wish to consult with an otolaryngologist.

5. REFERENCES

A.. Can Kidney Disease Lead to Hearing Loss?

The multifaceted links between hearing loss and chronic kidney disease
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41581-024-00808-2#:~:text=A%20strong%2C%20graded%20and%20independent,are%20also%20at%20increased%20risk.

Hearing impairment among chronic kidney disease patients on haemodialysis at a tertiary hospital in Ghana
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6842730/#:~:text=Chronic%20kidney%20disease%20is%20a,can%20lead%20to%20hearing%20loss.

What is the relationship between the kidneys and the ears?
Tissues of the kidney and the inner ear are similar and share a common metabolic function, therefore problems that affect kidney function can also damage the inner ear. High blood pressure, diabetes and a family history of CKD can increase your risk of developing kidney problems and hearing problems.
https://yvdwaudiology.co.za/blog/your-kidneys-and-your-ears/#:~:text=Tissues%20of%20the%20kidney%20and,kidney%20problems%20and%20hearing%20problems.

Hearing Loss  in Patients on Hemodialysis

Hearing impairment among chronic kidney disease patients on haemodialysis at a tertiary hospital in Ghana
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6842730/

Hearing loss causes
https://www.healthyhearing.com/help/hearing-loss/causes

The Link Between Kidneys and Your Hearing
https://hearinghealthfoundation.org/blogs/the-link-between-your-kidneys-and-your-hearing

Kidney Disease a Surprising Reason For Hearing Loss
https://www.hearingunlimited.net/kidney-disease-a-surprising-reason-for-hearing-loss/
(a specific part of our ears shares functional and structural characteristics with our kidneys. Research has confirmed that physiological mechanisms of fluid and electrolyte balance are present in both organs. This matters because it means that when a health issue affects the functionality of one (i.e. the kidneys or the ears), it’s likely to affect the other. So while hearing loss doesn’t cause CKD – or vice versa – patients with certain types of hearing loss are likely to experience problems with their kidneys (and vice versa).


The Relationship Between Cochlea and Kidney
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/227808405_The_Relationship_Between_Cochlea_and_Kidney

B. Other Kidney Diseases That Can Cause Hearing Loss:

• Alport's Syndrome
From the NKF:
Alport's Syndrome
https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/alport (General Description);

Alport's Syndrome; Symptoms and Causes
https://www.pennmedicine.org/for-patients-and-visitors/patient-information/conditions-treated-a-to-z/alport-syndrome

Characterization of Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Children with Alport Syndrome
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7766141/

How often does Alport syndrome cause hearing loss?

Approximately 80% of males with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) develop hearing loss during their lifetime, often by their teens. Hearing loss in females with XLAS is less frequent and occurs later in life, although about 40% will experience hearing loss.

Hearing Loss in Alport syndrome
https://alportsyndrome.org/hearing-loss-in-alport-syndrome/

Alport syndrome
https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/alport-syndrome/#frequency

Deafblind Fact Sheet: Alport Syndrome
https://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-db_factsheetwp_alport#:~:text=Approximately%2080%25%20of%20young%20males,often%20by%20their%20teenage%20years.




• Polycystic Kidney Disease

Studies have shown that Polycystic Kidney Disease can cause hearing loss. One study in particular found a family with ADPKD associated with bilateral sensorineural deafness in a pedigree of four affected members in four generations.

Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Associated with Familial Sensorineural Deafness
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/003655999750016302

Polycystic kidney disease and sensorineural deafness
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283581697_Polycystic_kidney_disease_and_sensorineural_deafness
Hearing Loss and Meniere's Disease

Connection Between Meniere's Disease and CKD

Chronic kidney disease is associated with increased risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss and Ménière’s disease: a nationwide cohort study
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8511089/



Meniere's Disease
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/menieres-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20374910
(Meniere's disease is an inner ear problem that can cause dizzy spells, also called vertigo, and hearing loss. Most of the time, Meniere's disease affects only one ear.

Meniere's disease can happen at any age. But it usually starts between the ages of 40 to 60. It's thought to be a lifelong condition. But some treatments can help ease symptoms and lessen how it affects your life long term.)

What is Meniere's Disease?
https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/menieres-disease

Meniere Disease
https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/menieres-disease


C. Diseases In General That Can Cause Hearing Loss :

Certain diseases can cause hearing loss, including meningitis, mumps, cytomegalovirus and chickenpox. Severe cases of jaundice can also cause hearing loss. other causes – other causes of deafness include Meniere's disease and exposure to certain chemicals.

Deafness - a range of causes
https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/deafness-a-range-of-causes

D. Conclusion
Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Comprehensive Review
https://www.cureus.com/articles/169480-sensorineural-hearing-loss-in-patients-with-chronic-kidney-disease-a-comprehensive-review#!/





















THE CONNECTION BETWEEN CKD AND HEARING LOSS


1. INTRODUCTION

In my lifetime I have lost the hearing in my right ear. Recently, I discovered that my hearing loss may be connected to my 42 years of CKD/PKD, so I wanted to share what I have learned.

I did a Broadcast on Friday, March 8, 2024 on Hearing Loss and Kidney Disease.
https://www.facebook.com/share/v/UjtBWRctbtTqoF4i/?mibextid=oFDknk

Here are some of my thoughts.



2. IS THERE A CONNECTION BETWEEN  KIDNEY DISEASE AND YOUR LOSS OF HEARING?

According to experts, there is a connection Kidney Disease and a Loss of Hearing. (Nature.com)

There are nearly 1.6 billion people that and suffer from a hearing loss & is the third-leading cause of disability worldwide.
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also a common condition that is associated with adverse clinical outcomes and high health-care costs. It affects 15% of US adults & 37 million people are estimated to have chronic kidney disease.

The question is whether or not there is a connection between the two.  The answer appears to be yes. According to experts, The kidneys and the hearing organs share a common morphogenetic(same cells, tisue & genetic structure)origin and rely on similar biological structures (for example, cilia) and processes (for example, specialized cellular transport mechanisms) to function.

So the same Genetic Abnormalities that cause CKD can also cause hearing loss, and vice versa.

The NIH states," Inadequate excretion of metabolic waste products by the kidneys results in circulation of these toxic materials in the body. This can cause damage to tissues and organ systems including the auditory system which can lead to hearing loss."

According to Nature.com, "A strong, graded and independent relationship exists between kidney function and the risk of hearing loss; the highest risk is observed in patients on haemodialysis, but kidney transplant recipients and people with mild CKD are also at increased risk."

Because tissue in our ear is substantially similar to the tissue in our kidneys, the toxic build up that damages kidney tissue also is capable of damaging inner ear tissue.

This appears to be confirmed by a 2010 study in Australia, that not just specific Kidney Diseases, but Kidney Disease in general can cause hearing loss in Kidney Patients. "This study examined the medical records of 2,564 people aged 50 and over, 513 of whom had moderate chronic kidney disease. Some 54.4% of all the patients with chronic kidney disease had some degree of hearing loss, as compared to only 28.3% of those who had no kidney problems.” Even more interesting, 30% of the CKD patients had a severe hearing loss compared to just 10% in those patients without CKD."

The study concluded, "The link can be explained by structural and functional similarities between tissues in the inner ear and in the kidney. Additionally, toxins that accumulate in kidney failure can damage nerves, including those in the inner ear." Also, some treatments for kidney ailments are ototoxic, meaning they cause hearing loss."

As stated earlier, this is readily found in patients that are on hemodialysis.

Experts suggest that Infants, children and  adults with malformation or dysfunction of their hearing organs should be evaluated for the presence of malformation or dysfunction of their kidneys, and people with Kidney Disease should have their hearing checked for loss.

3. IN CERTAIN TYPES OF KIDNEY DISEASES HEARING LOSS IS MORE PROMINENT THAN IN OTHERS

Some types of Kidney Diseases are mentioned more prominently than others in the literature as causes of hearing loss and if you have one of these diseases you may wish to have your hearing checked as well as your  kidney function.



These diseases include:

• Alport's Syndrome
• Polycystic Kidney Disease
• Meniere's Disease

Many people with Alport's Syndrome have problems with their ears and eyes. Alport syndrome is a rare inherited disorder that damages the tiny blood vessels in the kidneys. It can also cause hearing loss and eye problems.

Alport syndrome is an inherited form of kidney inflammation (nephritis). It is caused by a defect (mutation) in a gene for a protein in the connective tissue, called collagen.

The disorder is rare. There are three genetic types:

• X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) -- This is the most common type. The disease is more severe in males than in females.

• Autosomal recessive Alport syndrome (ARAS) -- Males and females have equally severe disease.

• Autosomal dominant Alport syndrome (ADAS) -- This is the rarest type. Males and females have equally severe disease.

The frequency in which hearing loss appears with Alport's is striking. Studies show that, approximately, 70% of patients with AS suffer from progressive sensorineural hearing loss.  Over time, Alport syndrome also leads to hearing loss in both ears. By the early teens, it is more common in males with XLAS, though in females, hearing loss is not as common and happens when they're adults. With ARAS, boys and girls have hearing loss during childhood. With ADAS, it occurs later in life. Hearing loss usually occurs before kidney failure.

Approximately 80% of males with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) develop hearing loss during their lifetime, often by their teens. Hearing loss in females with XLAS is less frequent and occurs later in life, although about 40% will experience hearing loss.

Hearing Loss With Polycystic Kidney Disease
Studies have shown that Polycystic Kidney Disease can cause hearing loss. One study in particular found a family with ADPKD associated with bilateral sensorineural deafness in a pedigree of four affected members in four generations.

Hearing Loss and Meniere's Disease

Several studies  harmful effects of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on the audiovestibular system. This would include a connection between Chronic Kidney Disease and Meniere's Disease. Patients with CKD had a significantly increased incidence of Ménière’s disease,


According to the Mayo Clinic, Meniere's disease is an inner ear problem that can cause dizzy spells, also called vertigo, and hearing loss. Most of the time, Meniere's disease affects only one ear.

Meniere's disease can happen at any age. But it usually starts between the ages of 40 to 60. It's thought to be a lifelong condition. But some treatments can help ease symptoms and lessen how it affects your life long term.

Symptoms of Meniere's disease include:

• Regular dizzy spells. You have a spinning feeling that starts and stops suddenly. Vertigo may start without warning. It usually lasts 20 minutes to 12 hours, but not more than 24 hours. Serious vertigo can cause nausea.

• Hearing loss. Hearing loss in Meniere's disease may come and go, especially early on. Over time, hearing loss can be long-lasting and not get better.

• Ringing in the ear. Ringing in the ear is called tinnitus. Tinnitus is the term for when you have a ringing, buzzing, roaring, whistling or hissing sound in your ear.

• Feeling of fullness in the ear. People with Meniere's disease often feel pressure in the ear. This is called aural fullness.

After a vertigo attack, symptoms get better and might go away for a while. Over time, how many vertigo attacks you have may lessen.

To Diagnose Meniere's, the physician will conduct an exam and asks about your health history. A Meniere's disease diagnosis needs to include:

• Two or more vertigo attacks, each lasting 20 minutes to 12 hours, or up to 24 hours.

• Hearing loss proved by a hearing test.

• Tinnitus or a feeling of fullness or pressure in the ear.
A Balance Assessment will take place.

Between vertigo attacks, balance returns to normal for most people with Meniere's disease. But you might have some ongoing balance problems.

Tests that study how well the inner ear is working include:

Electronystagmogram or videonystagmography (ENG or VNG). These tests measure balance by studying eye movement. One part of the test looks at eye movement while your eyes follow a target. One part studies eye movement while your head is put in different positions. A third test, called the caloric test, follows eye movement by using temperature changes to trigger a reaction from the inner ear. Your healthcare provider may use warm and cold air or water in the ear for the caloric test.

No cure exists for Meniere's disease. Some treatments can help lessen how bad vertigo attacks are and how long they last. But there are no treatments for permanent hearing loss. Your healthcare provider may be able to suggest treatments that prevent your hearing loss from getting worse.

Treatment Methods include:

Medicines for vertigo

Your healthcare provider may prescribe medicines to take during a vertigo attack so that it's less severe:

• Motion sickness medicines. Medicines such as meclizine (Antivert) or diazepam (Valium) may lessen the spinning feeling and help control nausea and vomiting.

• Anti-nausea medicines. Medicines such as promethazine might control nausea and vomiting during a vertigo attack.

• Diuretics and betahistine. These medicines can be used together or alone to improve vertigo. Diuretics lower how much fluid is in the body, which may lower the amount of extra fluid in the inner ear. Betahistines ease vertigo symptoms by improving blood flow to the inner ear.

Long-term medicine use

Your healthcare provider may prescribe a medicine to reduce fluid retention and suggest limiting your salt intake. This helps control the intensity and amount of Meniere's disease symptoms in some people.

Noninvasive therapies and procedures

Some people with Meniere's disease may benefit from procedures that don't include surgery, such as:

• Rehabilitation. If you have balance problems between vertigo attacks, vestibular rehabilitation therapy might improve your balance.

• Hearing aid. A hearing aid in the ear affected by Meniere's disease might improve your hearing. Your healthcare provider can refer you to an ear doctor, also called an audiologist, to talk about the best hearing aids for you.

If conservative treatments aren't successful, your care provider might suggest more-intense treatments.

Middle ear injections

Medicines injected and absorbed in the middle ear may help vertigo symptoms get better. This treatment is done in a care provider's office. Injections can include:

• Gentamicin. This is an antibiotic that's toxic to your inner ear. It works by damaging the sick part of your ear that's causing vertigo. Your healthy ear then takes on the job for balance. But there is a risk of further hearing loss.

• Steroids. Steroids such as dexamethasone also may help control vertigo attacks in some people. Dexamethasone may not work as well as gentamicin. But it's less likely to cause further hearing loss.

Surgery

If vertigo attacks from Meniere's disease are severe and hard to bear and other treatments don't help, surgery might be an option. Procedures include:

• Endolymphatic sac surgery. The endolymphatic sac helps control inner ear fluid levels. This procedure relieves pressure around the endolymphatic sac, which can improve fluid levels. Sometimes, a care provider places a tube inside your ear to drain any extra fluid.

• Labyrinthectomy. With this procedure, the surgeon removes the parts of your ear causing vertigo, which causes complete hearing loss in that ear. This allows your healthy ear to be in charge of sending information about balance and hearing to your brain. Care providers only suggest this procedure if you have poor hearing or total hearing loss in the diseased ear.

• Vestibular nerve section. This procedure involves cutting the vestibular nerve to prevent information about movement from getting to the brain. The vestibular nerve sends balance and movement information from your inner ear to the brain. This procedure usually improves vertigo and keeps hearing in the diseased ear. Most people need medicine that puts them in a sleep-like state, called general anesthesia, and an overnight hospital stay.


What illness causes hearing damage?

Certain diseases can cause hearing loss, including meningitis, mumps, cytomegalovirus and chickenpox. Severe cases of jaundice can also cause hearing loss. other causes – other causes of deafness include Meniere's disease and exposure to certain chemicals.

4. CONCLUSIONS

There is a significant relationship between CKD and Hearing Loss. One recent article states, "Patients with CKD are predisposed to several otorhinolaryngological issues especially SNHL, and the link between SNHL (sensorineural hearing loss)
and CKD has both been extensively explained, but the relationship between the remaining complications and CKD is still unknown."

In plain English, if you suffer from CKD, you should get your hearing checked, and if you have any symptoms that we have discussed today, you may wish to consult with an otolaryngologist.

5. REFERENCES

A.. Can Kidney Disease Lead to Hearing Loss?

The multifaceted links between hearing loss and chronic kidney disease
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41581-024-00808-2#:~:text=A%20strong%2C%20graded%20and%20independent,are%20also%20at%20increased%20risk.

Hearing impairment among chronic kidney disease patients on haemodialysis at a tertiary hospital in Ghana
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6842730/#:~:text=Chronic%20kidney%20disease%20is%20a,can%20lead%20to%20hearing%20loss.

What is the relationship between the kidneys and the ears?
Tissues of the kidney and the inner ear are similar and share a common metabolic function, therefore problems that affect kidney function can also damage the inner ear. High blood pressure, diabetes and a family history of CKD can increase your risk of developing kidney problems and hearing problems.
https://yvdwaudiology.co.za/blog/your-kidneys-and-your-ears/#:~:text=Tissues%20of%20the%20kidney%20and,kidney%20problems%20and%20hearing%20problems.

Hearing Loss  in Patients on Hemodialysis

Hearing impairment among chronic kidney disease patients on haemodialysis at a tertiary hospital in Ghana
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6842730/

Hearing loss causes
https://www.healthyhearing.com/help/hearing-loss/causes

The Link Between Kidneys and Your Hearing
https://hearinghealthfoundation.org/blogs/the-link-between-your-kidneys-and-your-hearing

Kidney Disease a Surprising Reason For Hearing Loss
https://www.hearingunlimited.net/kidney-disease-a-surprising-reason-for-hearing-loss/
(a specific part of our ears shares functional and structural characteristics with our kidneys. Research has confirmed that physiological mechanisms of fluid and electrolyte balance are present in both organs. This matters because it means that when a health issue affects the functionality of one (i.e. the kidneys or the ears), it’s likely to affect the other. So while hearing loss doesn’t cause CKD – or vice versa – patients with certain types of hearing loss are likely to experience problems with their kidneys (and vice versa).


The Relationship Between Cochlea and Kidney
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/227808405_The_Relationship_Between_Cochlea_and_Kidney

B. Other Kidney Diseases That Can Cause Hearing Loss:

• Alport's Syndrome
From the NKF:
Alport's Syndrome
https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/alport (General Description);

Alport's Syndrome; Symptoms and Causes
https://www.pennmedicine.org/for-patients-and-visitors/patient-information/conditions-treated-a-to-z/alport-syndrome

Characterization of Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Children with Alport Syndrome
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7766141/

How often does Alport syndrome cause hearing loss?

Approximately 80% of males with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) develop hearing loss during their lifetime, often by their teens. Hearing loss in females with XLAS is less frequent and occurs later in life, although about 40% will experience hearing loss.

Hearing Loss in Alport syndrome
https://alportsyndrome.org/hearing-loss-in-alport-syndrome/

Alport syndrome
https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/alport-syndrome/#frequency

Deafblind Fact Sheet: Alport Syndrome
https://www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/sd-db_factsheetwp_alport#:~:text=Approximately%2080%25%20of%20young%20males,often%20by%20their%20teenage%20years.




• Polycystic Kidney Disease

Studies have shown that Polycystic Kidney Disease can cause hearing loss. One study in particular found a family with ADPKD associated with bilateral sensorineural deafness in a pedigree of four affected members in four generations.

Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Associated with Familial Sensorineural Deafness
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/003655999750016302

Polycystic kidney disease and sensorineural deafness
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283581697_Polycystic_kidney_disease_and_sensorineural_deafness
Hearing Loss and Meniere's Disease

Connection Between Meniere's Disease and CKD

Chronic kidney disease is associated with increased risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss and Ménière’s disease: a nationwide cohort study
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8511089/



Meniere's Disease
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/menieres-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20374910
(Meniere's disease is an inner ear problem that can cause dizzy spells, also called vertigo, and hearing loss. Most of the time, Meniere's disease affects only one ear.

Meniere's disease can happen at any age. But it usually starts between the ages of 40 to 60. It's thought to be a lifelong condition. But some treatments can help ease symptoms and lessen how it affects your life long term.)

What is Meniere's Disease?
https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/menieres-disease

Meniere Disease
https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/menieres-disease


C. Diseases In General That Can Cause Hearing Loss :

Certain diseases can cause hearing loss, including meningitis, mumps, cytomegalovirus and chickenpox. Severe cases of jaundice can also cause hearing loss. other causes – other causes of deafness include Meniere's disease and exposure to certain chemicals.

Deafness - a range of causes
https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/deafness-a-range-of-causes

D. Conclusion
Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Comprehensive Review
https://www.cureus.com/articles/169480-sensorineural-hearing-loss-in-patients-with-chronic-kidney-disease-a-comprehensive-review#!/